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Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of The artistic patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy (1419-1467). found in the catalog.

The artistic patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy (1419-1467).

Jeffrey Chipps Smith

The artistic patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy (1419-1467).

by Jeffrey Chipps Smith

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  • 32 Currently reading

Published by University Microfilms in Ann Arbor, Mich .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Philip, -- the Good, Duke of Burgundy.

  • Edition Notes

    Thesis (Ph.D.), Columbia University, 1979.

    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL22677002M

    Philip the Bold and John the Fearless were the first two Valois dukes of Burgundy, whose extreme wealth allowed them to flaunt their ability to adorn palaces and ecclesiastical buildings and commission great works of art. They were the trendsetters of their day and produced a Burgundian court style that was emulated across s: 4. The artistic patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy (); Ph.D., Columbia University, Smith, Jeffrey Chipps [ Book: ].

      Museum information. Art from the court of Burgundy: the patronage of Dukes Philip the Bold and John the Fearless, will be the theme of the Cleveland Museum of Art’s international symposium. This symposium is part of CMA’s special exhibition Dukes and angels: art from the court of Burgundy (–) on view Octo , through January 9, Man in a Red Turban () by Jan Van Eyck, one of the great Flemish painters and a pioneer of the Renaissance under Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy, in Bruges. Northern Renaissance (c).

    RECUYELL OF THE HISTORYES OF TROYE [TRANSLATED BY WILLIAM CAXTON]. (c. ), by Raoul Lefèvre, who was probably a chaplain to Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy. The Recueil is not primarily a This places the circumstances of production firmly in the circles of artistic patronage responsible for the luxurious manuscripts associated. Philip of Rouvres ( – Novem ) was the Count of Burgundy (as Philip II) and Count of Artois (as Philip III) from , Duke of Burgundy (as Philip I) from , and Count of Auvergne and Boulogne (as Philip III) from He was the only son of Philip, heir to the Duchy of Burgundy, and Joan I, heiress of Auvergne and Boulogne.


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The artistic patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy (1419-1467) by Jeffrey Chipps Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. The artistic patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy () by Jeffrey Chipps Smith,University Microfilms edition, in English.

Philip the Good (French: Philippe le Bon; Dutch: Filips de Goede; 31 July – 15 June ) was Duke of Burgundy from until his death. He was a member of a cadet line of the Valois dynasty, to which all the 15th-century kings of France his reign, the Burgundian State reached the apex of its prosperity and prestige and became a leading center of the : 31 JulyDijon, Duchy of Burgundy.

The artistic patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy () by Jeffrey Chipps Smith, edition, in EnglishPages: – Robert W. Hamilton Book Prize for the best text book (for The Northern Renaissance) written by a University of Texas faculty member for Publications Jeffrey Chipps Smith Publications A.

Books and Catalogues "The Artistic Patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy ()," Ph.D. John the Good’s four sons proved exceptional patrons of the arts: Charles V (r. –80), Louis, duke of Anjou, Jean, duke of Berry, and Philip the Bold, duke of Burgundy, rivaled each other in magnificence at their courts in Paris, Angers, Bourges, and Dijon.

Philip the Bold (French: Philippe le Hardi; Dutch: Filips de Stoute; 17 January – 27 April ) was Duke of Burgundy (as Philip II) and jure uxoris Count of Flanders (as Philip II), Artois and Burgundy (as Philip IV).

The fourth and youngest son of King John II of France and his wife, Bonne of Luxembourg, Philip was the founder of the Burgundian branch of the House of Duke of Burgundy book. Following the reigns of Philip the Bold and his son John the Fearless (–, r.

–19), their successors Philip the Good (–, r. –67) and Charles the Bold (–, r. –77)—third and fourth Valois dukes of Burgundy—ruled through an increasingly centralized government and became celebrated art patrons.

Philip III, byname Philip the Good or French Philippe Le Bon, (born JDijon, Burgundy [now in France]—died JBruges [now Brugge, Belgium]), the most important of the Valois dukes of Burgundy (reigned –67) and the true founder of the Burgundian state that rivaled France in the 15th century.

Philip was the son of John the Fearless and Margaret of Bavaria. During his reign as Duke of Burgundy, Philip the Good managed to double the size of his duchy. By various methods such as inheritance, treaty, conquest and purchase, he acquired the territories of Hainaut, Holland, Zeeland, Friesland, Brabant, Limburg, Namur, Luxembourg, Liège, Cambrai and other numerous cities and feudal dependencies.

Under Philip the Good, grandson of the founder of the duchy's power, Burgundy reached its apogee. Professor Vaughan portrays not only Philip the Good himself, perhaps the most attractive personality among the four great dukes, but the workings of the court and of one of the most efficent - if not necessarily the most popular - administrations in fifteenth-century s: Philip the Good.

Philip the Good () was Duke of Burgundy from to His brilliant and sumptuous court was the most celebrated in Europe, and Burgundian power and cultural life flowered under his patronage.

Born at Dijon on JPhilip the Good was the son of Duke John the Fearless and Margaret of Bavaria. The Book of Hours of Philip of Burgundy dates from c For a book of hours it is quite large; it was copied by Jean Miélot, the duke's secretary. A large part of the illuminations were made by Jean le Tavernier from Audenarde, an artist who specialized in grisaille, a.

Philip the Good, –, duke of Burgundy (–67); son of Duke John the Fearless John the Fearless, –, duke of Burgundy (–19); son of Philip the Bold. He fought against the Turks at Nikopol in and was a prisoner for a year until he was ransomed. Art from the Court of Burgundy commemorates the sixth centenary of the death of Philip the Bold () of the house of Valois, the first Duke of Burgundy and brother of the King of extraordinary artistic flowering of this period, stimulated by interaction among the princely courts of France and the Low Countries, found strikingly individual expression at/5(2).

The dukes of Burgundy were great art patrons and understood that artwork could support their dynastic and political goals as well as adorn their walls. Philip the Bold's (r. - ) greatest artistic enterprise was the building of the Chartreuse (charter house in English) of Champmol, near Dijon - a. Philip III 'the Good', Duke of Burgundy, Lorraine, Brabant, & Limburg, Count of Flanders, Artois, Hainault, Holland, Zeeland, & Namur married Catherine de la Tufferie, daughter of Martin de la Tufferie and Richarde de la Plancq, DID NOT MARRY.5 Philip III 'the Good', Duke of Burgundy, Lorraine, Brabant, & Limburg, Count of Flanders, Artois.

Undergraduate: Duke University, Durham, N.C. B.A. Cum Laude with Special Honors in Art History Graduate: Columbia University, New York City M.A. Ph.D. Dissertation Topic: "The Artistic Patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy ()" 3.

Academic Awards. Born inPhilip gained his cognomen the Bold when, at the age of 14, he fought beside his father at the Battle of Poitiers in He was created Duke of Touraine inbut inas a reward for his behaviour at Poitiers, he returned this to the crown, receiving instead from his father the Duchy of Burgundy in apanage, which his father had been Duke of since the death of Philip of.

Start studying AP Art History Ch. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. became the court painter of Philip the Good, duke of Burgundy used artistic patronage to "cleanse" wealth that was perceived as ill-gotten through usury. Art patronage was especially important in the creation.

Portrait of Jean Gros Origin Flanders Date – Medium Oil on panel The Art Institute of Chicago, General Catalogue of Paintings, Sculpture, and Other Objects in the Museum,p.no.

“The Artistic Patronage of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy (–),” Ph.D. diss., Columbia University,p. Philip II, byname Philip the Bold, French Philippe le Hardi, (born Jan. 17,Pontoise, France—died ApHalle, Brabant), duke of Burgundy (–) and the youngest son of the French king John II the Good.

One of the most powerful men of his day in France, he was for a time regent for his nephew Charles VI; and when Charles went insane, he became virtual ruler of France.Isabeau of Bavaria (also Isabella of Bavaria-Ingolstadt; c.

– 24 September ) was Queen consort of France () as spouse of King Charles VI of France, a member of the Valois Dynasty. She assumed a prominent role in public affairs during the disastrous later years of her husband's.This catalogue – the English language version of L’art à la cour de Bourgogne: le mécénat de Philippe le Hardi et de Jean sans Peur () – accompanied the exhibition commemorating the th anniversary of the death of Philip the Bold (), the first Valois duke of Burgundy and brother of Charles V, king of France.

From the start, some readers may find it somewhat.